CLN Convention Online RN Refresher Course Nurse Leadership Awards AHRQ Partnership with CLN Student and Faculty Background Checks CT Nursing Guide 65 over 65 nominations CLN Online Clinical Faculty Course

Calendar

  • Su
  • Mo
  • Tu
  • We
  • Th
  • Fr
  • Sa
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
Support CLN

AHRQ & CLN Co-Branded Research Summaries

CLN has partnered with the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality to help promote and distribute research summaries about the benefits and risks of different conditions to support nursing and allied health students as well as the practicing nurse in all healthcare settings. The 38 co-branded national publications feature can be used in academic settings by nursing and allied health faculty to support the education of students with research on various health conditions. They can also be used in practice/clinical settings to support patients and families with condition-specific educational materials.

Review these 38 co-branded research summaries below and download the electronic pdfs free of charge.

All the publications are partnered with PowerPoint Sides, White Papers and Continuing Education Modules that can be accessed by visiting the AHRQ website.

http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/

Treatments for Open-Angle Glaucoma - A Review of the Research for Adults
The information in this summary comes from the report Treatment for Glaucoma: Comparative Effectiveness, April 2012. The report was produced by the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

Treatments for Open-Angel Glaucoma

Comparisons of Medical, Laser, and Incisional Surgical Treatments for Open-Angle Glaucoma in Adults
In response to a request from the public regarding treatments for open-angle glaucoma (OAG), a systematic review was undertaken to summarize the evidence regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of medications and laser and other surgical treatments for OAG in adults. This review only included studies with clearly defined OAG participants ?40 years of age and did not cover juvenile/congenital, traumatic, neovascular, refractory, or inflammatory glaucoma. The review included 109 clinical studies (73 randomized controlled trials, 13 observational studies, and 23 systematic reviews) that were published through October 2011. This summary is provided to assist in decisionmaking along with a patient's values and preferences.

Comparisons of Medical, Laser, and Incisional Surgical Treatments for Open-Angle Glaucoma in Adults

Treating Sleep Apnea - A Review of the Research for Adults
In response to a request from the public regarding obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a common disorder associated with serious morbidity and mortality, a review was undertaken to examine the comparative effectiveness of approaches for screening, diagnosing, and treating OSA. The systematic review included 234 clinical studies published through September 2010. The full report, listing all studies, is available at http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/apnea.cfm. This summary, based on the full report of research evidence, is provided to inform discussions of options with patients and to assist in decisionmaking along with consideration of a patient's values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Treating Sleep Apnea

Comparative Effectiveness of Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults
In response to a request from the public regarding obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a common disorder associated with serious morbidity and mortality, a review was undertaken to examine the comparative effectiveness of approaches for screening, diagnosing, and treating OSA.

Comparative Effectiveness of Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep Apnea

Human Growth Hormone for Children with Cystic Fibrosis - A Review of Research for Parents & Caregivers
The information in this guide comes from the report Effectiveness of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) in the Treatment of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis. It was produced by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Human Growth Hormone for Children With Cystic Fibrosis

Use of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Pediatric Patients With Cystic Fibrosis
The information in this guide is based on Effectiveness of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) in the Treatment of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis, Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 23, prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10067-I for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, October 2010. AHRQ Pub. No. 11-EHC003-EF.

Use of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Pediatric Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

Treatment Options for ADHD in Children and Teens - A Review of Research for Parents & Caregivers
The information in this summary comes from the report Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effectiveness of Treatment in At-Risk Preschoolers; Long-term Effectiveness in All Ages; and Variability in Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Treatment, October 2011. The report was produced by the McMaster University Evidence based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Treatment Options for ADHD in Children and Teens- A Review of Research for Parents and Caregivers

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents
In response to a request from the public, a review was undertaken to evaluate the evidence regarding 1) the potential benefits and adverse effects associated with treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in preschoolers, 2) the long-term effectiveness of interventions for ADHD in individuals 6 years of age and older, and 3) the variability of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment associated with potential moderating factors. The systematic review included 223 studies published from January 1980 through May 2010.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

Medicines for Type 2 Diabetes - A Review of the Research for Adults
The information in this summary comes from the report Oral Diabetes Medications for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: An Update. It was produced by the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center through funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Medicines for Type 2 Diabetes

Comparing Medications for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes
A systematic review of 166 clinical studies published between January 1966 and April 2010 examined the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of available monotherapy and two-drug combinations of medications for adults with type 2 diabetes (see list on page 2). The review did not cover treatment of type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes nor does it review evidence regarding the effectiveness of diet, exercise, and weight loss.

Comparing Medications for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

Premixed Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes - A Guide for Adults
The information in this guide comes from a detailed review of 45 research reports. The review is called Comparative Effectiveness, Safety, and Indications of Insulin Analogues in Premixed Formulations for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes (2008) and was written by the Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) created the Eisenberg Center at Oregon Health & Science University to make research helpful for consumers. This guide was written by Monica Goei, M.D., Martha Schechtel, R.N., Seth Meyer, M.A., Joe Stewart, B.C.N.S.P., Rachelle Nicolai, B.A., Valerie King, M.D., and David Hickam, M.D., of the Eisenberg Center. People taking insulin for type 2 diabetes helped them develop this guide.

Premixed Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes

Premixed Insulin Analogues - A Comparison with Other Treatments for Type 2 Diabetes
Premixed insulin analogues are an option for treating adults with type 2 diabetes. This guide summarizes clinical evidence comparing the effectiveness and safety of premixed insulin analogues with other insulin preparations and oral diabetes drugs. This guide does not address the use of insulin in pumps. It does not address the effectiveness of insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes, women with gestational diabetes, or people younger than 18 years old. It also does not cover evidence about the effectiveness of dietary and other lifestyle modifications for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Premixed Insulin Analogues

Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease - A Review of the Research for Adults
The information in this summary comes from the report Management Strategies for Adults With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease - An Update. The report was prepared by Tufts Medical Center Evidence based Practice Center for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease

Managing Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
As an update to a 2005 report, a systematic review of 166 clinical studies published between January 2004 and August 2010 examined the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of treatments for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and investigated whether there are factors that influence or predict treatment effectiveness. The review did not evaluate diagnostic approaches, treatment options for patients with refractory symptoms, or the effect of lifestyle modifications on GERD symptoms.

Managing Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Non-surgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence - A Review of the Research for Women
The information in this summary comes from the report Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women: Diagnosis and Comparative Effectiveness, April 2012. The report was produced by the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Women with urinary incontinence reviewed this summary.

Non-surgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence

Non-surgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women: Diagnosis & Comparative Effectiveness
The Effective Health Care Program was initiated in 2005 to provide valid evidence about the comparative effectiveness of different medical interventions. The object is to help consumers, health care providers, and others in making informed choices among treatment alternatives. Through its Comparative Effectiveness Reviews, the program supports systematic appraisals of existing scientific evidence regarding treatments for high-priority health conditions. It also promotes and generates new scientific evidence by identifying gaps in existing scientific evidence and supporting new research. The program puts special emphasis on translating findings into a variety of useful formats for different stakeholders, including consumers.

Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women

Treating Chronic Pelvic Pain - A Review of the Research for Women
The information in this summary comes from the report Noncyclic Chronic Pelvic Pain Therapies for Women: Comparative Effectiveness, January 2012. The report was produced by the Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Women with chronic pelvic pain reviewed this summary

Treating Chronic Pelvic Pain

Effectiveness of Treatments for Noncyclic Chronic Pelvic Pain in Adult Women
In response to the need for a comprehensive evaluation of the evidence regarding current therapies for chronic pelvic pain (CPP) in adult women, a systematic review assessed the comparative effectiveness of surgical and non-surgical treatments for CPP and the potential harms of non-surgical approaches. This review focused on noncyclic and mixed cyclic/noncyclic CPP, and excluded pain that was associated with dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, dyschezia, or dysuria. A total of 36 studies published between January 1990 and May 2011 were reviewed.

Effectiveness of Treatments for Noncyclic Chronic Pelvic Pain in Adult Women

Medicines for Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease - A Review of the Research for Adults With Kidney Disease and Diabetes or High Blood Pressure
The information in this summary comes from the report Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1-3: Screening, Monitoring, and Treatment, January 2012. The report was produced by the University of Minnesota Evidence based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Patients with mild kidney disease and diabetes or hypertension reviewed this summary.

Medicines for Chronic Kidney Disease

Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1-3
A systematic review that included 110 reports of eligible studies published from January 1985 through January 2011 was undertaken to determine the potential benefits and adverse effects of screening, monitoring, and treatments for adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 1-3. CKD stages 1-3 are defined as: 1 (kidney damage with a glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >90 mL/min/1.73 m2), 2 (kidney damage with a GFR of 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2), or 3 (a GFR of 30-59mL/min/1.73 m2, regardless of kidney damage). The systematic review excluded studies of patients with CKD stages 4 and 5. This is a summary of the systematic review meant to assist in decision making along with a patient's values and preferences and should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1-3

Choosing Medicines for High Blood Pressure - A Review of the Research on ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs
The information comes from the report Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs), Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists (ARBs), and Direct Renin Inhibitors for Treating Essential Hypertension: An Update. It was produced by the Duke University Evidence based Practice Center with funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary guide was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Choosing Medicines for High Blood Pressure

ACEIs, ARBs, or DRI for Adults With Hypertension
Among the many medications for antihypertensive therapy are those aimed at inhibiting or blocking the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). A systematic review of 110 clinical studies published between 1988 and 2010 sought to determine the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and a direct renin inhibitor (DRI) for adults with hypertension. The report does not review studies comparing: individual drugs within each class, evidence about using these drugs for congestive heart failure or diabetic kidney disease, switching from one drug class to another, or combination therapy. This summary is provided to assist in decision making along with a patient's values and preferences. Reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

ACEIs, ARBs, or DRI for Adults With Hypertension

"ACE Inhibitors" and "ARBs" To Protect Your Heart? A Guide for Patients Being Treated for Stable Coronary Heart Disease
The information in this guide comes from the report Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers Added to Standard Medical Therapy for Treating Stable Ischemic Heart Disease. It was produced by the University of Connecticut /Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare and Research Quality (AHRQ). Additional information came from a 2007 report titled Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs) and Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists (ARBs) for Treating Essential Hypertension, AHRQ Pub. No. 08-EHC003-EF, November 2007. This summary guide was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

ACE Inhibitors and ARBs To Protect Your Heart

Adding ACEIs and/or ARBs to Standard Therapy for Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: Benefits & Harms
The information in this summary is based on Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers Added to Standard Medical Therapy for Treating Stable Ischemic Heart Disease, Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 18, prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10067-I for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, October 2009. Available at: www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov. This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Adding ACEIs andor ARBs to Standard Therapy for Stable Ischemic Heart Disease Benefits and Harms

Depression After Brain Injury - A Guide for Patients and Their Caregivers
The information in this summary is based on Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers Added to Standard Medical Therapy for Treating Stable Ischemic Heart Disease, Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 18, prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10067-I for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, October 2009. Available at: www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov. This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Depression After Brain Injury

Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury
The information in this summary is based on Traumatic Brain Injury and Depression, Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 11-EHC017, prepared by the Vanderbilt University Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10065-I for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, March 2011. Available at www.effectivehealth care.ahrq.gov/tbidep.cfm. This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury

Antipsychotic Medicines for Children and Teens - A Review of the Research for Parents & Caregivers
The information in this summary comes from the report First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics for Children and Young Adults, February 2012. The report was produced by the University of Alberta Evidence based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Caregivers of children taking antipsychotics reviewed this summary.

Antipsychotic Medicines for Children and Teens

First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics for Children: Comparative Effectiveness
In response to a request from the public about the use of antipsychotics to treat psychiatric disorders of children and young adults, for both approved and "off-label" indications, a review was undertaken to examine what is known about the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of these drugs in children and young adults from 1 to 24 years of age. The systematic review included 81 clinical studies published between January 1987 and February 2011. The full report of research evidence is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/pedantipsych.cfm. This is a summary of the full report. It is provided to inform discussions of options with patients and their caregivers and to assist in decision making along with consideration of a patient's values and preferences. Reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics for Children

Therapies for Treatment: Resistant Depression - A Review of the Research
The information in this summary comes from the report Nonpharmacological Interventions for Treatment-Resistant Depression, September 2011. The report was produced by the RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Patients with depression reviewed this summary.

Therapies for Treatment-Resistant Depression

Nonpharmacologic Interventions for Treatment-Resistant Depression in Adults
The Effective Health Care Program was initiated in 2005 to provide valid evidence about the comparative effectiveness of different medical interventions. The object is to help consumers, health care providers, and others in making informed choices among treatment alternatives. Through its Comparative Effectiveness Reviews, the program supports systematic appraisals of existing scientific evidence regarding treatments for high-priority health conditions. It also promotes and generates new scientific evidence by identifying gaps in existing scientific evidence and supporting new research. The program puts special emphasis on translating findings into a variety of useful formats for different stakeholders, including consumers.

Nonpharmacologic Interventions for Treatment-Resistant Depression in Adults

Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears
The information in this guide comes from the report Comparative Effectiveness of Nonoperative and Operative Treatments for Rotator Cuff Tears. It was produced by the University of Alberta Evidence based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary guide was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears

Comparative Effectiveness of Interventions for Rotator Cuff Tears in Adults
The information in this summary is based on Comparative Effectiveness of Nonoperative and Operative Treatments for Rotator Cuff Tears, Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 22, prepared by the University of Alberta Evidence based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-02-0023 for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, July 2010. Available at: www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov. This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

32 Comparative Effectiveness of Interventions for Rotator Cuff Tears in Adults

Managing Osteoarthritis Pain With Medicines - A Review of the Research for Adults
The information in this summary comes from the report Analgesics for Osteoarthritis: An Update of the 2006 Comparative Effectiveness Review, October 2011. The report was produced by the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Patients with osteoarthritis reviewed this summary.

Managing Osteoarthritis Pain With Medicines

Analgesics for Osteoarthritis
As an update to a 2006 report, a systematic review of 273 clinical studies published between January 2005 and January 2011 examined the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of analgesics and the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin for osteoarthritis. The review did not include studies on opioid medications or nonpharmacological interventions for osteoarthritis.

Analgesics for Osteoarthritis

Preventing Blood Clots After Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery or Surgery for a Broken Hip - A Review of the Research for Adults
The information in this summary comes from the report Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery, March 2012. The report was produced by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Patients who have had a total hip or knee replacement surgery reviewed this summary.

Clots After Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery or Surgery for a Broken Hip

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery
This executive summary is part of the following document: Sobieraj DM, Coleman CI, Tongbram V, Lee S, Colby J, Chen WT, Makanji SS, Ashaye A, Kluger J, White CM. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 49. (Prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10067-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 12-EHC020-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. March 2012.

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery

Progestogens to Prevent Preterm Birth - A Review of the Research About Progestogens for Women at Risk
The information in this summary comes from the report Effectiveness of Progestogens for Prevention of Preterm Birth, August 2012. The report was produced by the Vanderbilt University Evidence based Practice Center through funding by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Pregnant women at risk of preterm birth helped review this summary.

Progestogens To Prevent Preterm Birth- A Review of the Research About Progestogens for Women at Risk

Progestogens to Prevention of Preterm Birth
A systematic review of 63 clinical studies published from 1966 to October 2011 examined the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of progestogens used to prevent preterm birth in several categories of at-risk women. This summary, based on the full report of research evidence, is provided to inform discussions of options with patients and to assist in decision making along with consideration of a patient's values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Progestogens for Prevention of Preterm Birth